Land The Interview

We are clearly in a buyer’s market where employers possess both leverage and pricing power. As the economy weakens and the unemployment rate rises, employees become more nervous about what the future holds for our companies and careers and begin searching for alternative opportunities. As a Human Resources Director, I track the response rates for my job postings and have seen a 54% increase in responses verses a year ago. The competition is fierce so you must be extremely proactive in your job search.
If you try to get an interview the same way everybody else does you will get the same results. You must be unique and use various strategies outside of the norm. Here are some tactics that can help you get your foot in the door.
Call the employer. Most candidates send their resume by email. A job posting can garner literally hundreds of resumes. It is impossible for the employer to screen and review all of them. In contrast, very few candidates call the hiring manager. So be different,
Step one is to call the company and find out who the hiring or recruiting manager is for the position of interest. Simply say “I have corresponded with the recruiter for the “position”, but am not quite sure of his/her name. Can you help me?”
Once you have the name of the hiring manager/recruiter put together a list of 4 or 5 critical reasons why you are a great candidate for the position. Then call, introduce yourself and say “the reason for my call is I have a strong background in . . . and believe my past successes such as [insert critical reasons] make me a great candidate for the position. I forwarded my resume and would love the chance to speak to you about my background to see if there is a good fit.” Focus the conversation on your strengths and close for the interview.
Send your resume by regular U.S. mail and email. Since the vast majority of resumes and correspondence today come through email, a hard copy sent through regular mail may ensure your resume gets noticed. Again, find out the name of the hiring manager and send your resume and cover letter to their attention.
Network into the organization. All of us know a lot of people. Create a list of your college friends, colleagues, vendors, friends and neighbors and you will quickly have access to a strong network to tap into. Networking sites like Linked-in (www.linkedin.com) and Facebook (www.facebook.com) can help by offering you a well defined network and identify where your connections are employed. The purpose of your network is not to get you hired, but rather to get you the meeting, whether by phone or face to face. Contact your network and ask for help.
Personally drop your resume off. Years ago as I was looking for an operations manager a candidate showed up at my workplace to introduce herself. She was professionally dressed, had her presentation down and was respectful of my time. She told me she simply wanted to ensure her resume was reviewed. Linda, who was a candidate I would have passed on if I received her resume via email, turned out to be one of the best hires I ever made.
We are in difficult economic times and changing jobs is very difficult for everyone, so you must differentiate yourself. Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again expecting different results. These techniques will help you get more interviews.

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